Prof. Michał Żochowski

 

prof. Michał Żochowski! 👏

 

Prof. Michał Żochowski is affiliated with the Department of Physics and The Biophysics Program at University of Michigan. He and his research group focuse mainly on dynamical aspects of information processing in the brain from the perspective of patter formation in complex networks.To understand those mechanisms, they connect theoretical as well as experimental approaches. Theoretical studies focus on synchronization and dynamical control in simple nonlinear systems, as well as in more complex, biologically feasible, computational models. They are especially interested in coupled systems with self-adaptive units that could model neuromodulatory processes in the neural systems. From the experimental side, they employ optical imaging systems (CCD camera and/or photodiode array) to monitor activity of large neuronal populations.
His lecture is titled "Understanding neural dynamics underlying memory consolidation during sleep" and he'll explain why after sleep we often remember rehearsed information or routine better than before, focusing on neuromodulatory effects of acetylcholine (ACh) and the role it can play in sleep dependent memory consolidation.



📌Title: Understanding neural dynamics underlying memory consolidation during sleep.

👨‍🏫 Abstract:

Why do we sleep? Why after sleep we often remember rehearsed information or routine better than before? It was discovered about a century ago that sleep facilitates memory consolidation however mechanisms underlying that phenomenon are still not known. At the sametime it is widely accepted the network dynamics underlying given brain function, is a complex outcome of network structure, modulatory states and incoming external input. In this talk I will focus on neuromodulatory effects of acetylcholine (ACh) and the role it can play in sleep dependent memory consolidation. I will build the modeling framework starting from understanding how ACh affects the excitation properties of individual neurons, then continue to show how these properties modulate network dynamics and finally hypothesize how network-wide dynamics mediate reorganization of sleep representations that lead, via STDP, to memory consolidation. The model predictions are closely compared to analysis of experimental data on sleep dependent contextual fear memory consolidation in mice. 

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